About The 2 Bridges Review

The celebrated East River Bridges (Two Bridges) – the Brooklyn and the Manhattan, connect downtown Brooklyn with downtown Manhattan. Between these bridges a community of writers and artists has found a home in the former warehouses and factories of New York’s most literary outer borough. Like the artists who make it, the art that lives in these narrow streets goes on its nerve, and we, nerved with newness – and just a bit nervy – want to fill our pages with a distinctive, eclectic assortment of work by both unknown & established writers and artists.

Share Your Work

We are open to nearly any kind of work with a few provisos: watch the profanity, the blood and guts, the icky details of bodily functions. We’re not the best place for your graphically violent horror stories, your erotica, or your language experiments run amok. As for now, we are not looking for scholarly articles or reviews – but that may change.

Poetry:

Submit up to three previously unpublished poems in one file in an attached word document (.doc). Long poems are ok. Separate poems clearly by titles.

Prose:

Submit up to 5,000 words. Novel excerpts are ok as long as they can stand alone.

Artwork and Photography:

Submit black and white or full color files.

We, like all other magazine editors, are looking for the best, and like all other editors, we’re long on expectation and short on definition. We are looking for the distinctive stamp of a real personality – observing, deliberating – engaging with the sometimes overlooked or inconspicuous aspects of our multifarious world. We are not crazy about language jumbles that blare but don’t amount to much beyond their own noise. But we do like audacity. We’re not particular about style, but we warn you: we lean towards meaning of some sort. We also don’t much like poems about first loves and break ups, unless they transcend their own solipsism and offer something to everyone else. We are wary of the overly arch, overly precious, overly artsy piece, but we’ll take all comers and read for your resonant moments. Just keep in mind: A great line does not a whole poem make.

Click Here for Submissions Guidelines

Submissions are now open. Submissions are closed from July 1st through October 31st.

Writers: please note that we are currently closed to submissions. We look forward to reading your work after this date.

To submit your work:

http://2bridgesreview.submittable.com/submit

Submission Guidelines

Submissions are now open. Submissions are closed from July 1st through October 31st.

Writers: please note that we are currently closed to submissions. We look forward to reading your work after this date.

How to submit your work

  1. We will only accept electronic submissions.
    To submit your work: http://2bridgesreview.submittable.com/submit

  2. Your email subject line should indicate the genre (poetry, fiction, nonfiction), your last name, and the number of pieces submitted. (ex. Subject: Poetry Jones Three)

  3. Include writer contact info and a brief bio on a cover page.

  4. Simultaneous submissions are ok, as long as you let us know right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere.

  5. Please don’t send us previously published work.

  6. 2BR acquires first-time North American rights. After publication, rights revert to the author and may be reprinted as long as appropriate acknowledgment to 2BR is made. Payment is in copies.

  7. We are closed to submissions in August and September. Bear with us: we are a start-up and will be shaped by the work we receive. We intend to take time reading your work and might hold onto it for a bit. We will do all we can to make timely decisions but all of us have full-time academic jobs and are likely to be more measured than hurried in order to avoid being careless. We will get back to you.

  8. Like our mothers always told us, “no means no”… but only for six months. Some of our moms also told us to try and try again. Please do try.

Who We Are

Editorial Staff

Kate Falvey, Editor in Chief

Kate Falvey’s poetry appears in a variety of print and online journals: Hoboeye, Umbrella, Memoir(And), Literary Mama, The Aroostook Review, Big Pond Rumour, The Mom Egg, Red Line Blues, Hospital Drive, and others. She has also published scholarly articles on women writers and work for children. She ran a New York University-based print journal called Icarus for ten years and is on the editorial board of the Bellevue Literary Review, produced through N.Y.U.’s Langone Medical Center.

George Guida, Poetry Editor

George Guida, 2 Bridges Review's founding Poetry Editor, began his editorial career as an intern at The Paris Review and The Hudson Review, where he worked under George Plimpton, Jonathan Dee, Frederick Morgan, and Paula Dietz. He went on to study with Grace Schulman, Allen Ginsberg, Morris Dickstein, Robert Viscusi and other literary lights at the City University of New York Graduate Center, where he earned a doctorate in American literature while getting involved in New York City's spoken word scene at venues such as the Nuyorican Poets Cafe and the Cornelia Street Cafe. He has directed or co-directed the Bensonhurst Reading Series, the Intercollegiate Poetry Slam at the Bowery Poetry Club, the Smalls Reading Series at Smalls Jazz Club in Greenwich Village, and the Dansville Authors Series in Western New York.

George is the author of four volumes of poetry—Low Italian, New York and Other Lovers, Pugilistic, and The Sleeping Gulf—along with two collections of stories, two collections of critical essays, and numerous individually published poems, stories, essays, and plays. He is at work on book about communities of poets across the United States, on a novel entitled The Carrying Place, and on two future volumes of poetry.

When he is not editing or writing, George teaches English and writing at New York City College of Technology. He has also taught on the faculty of the Controlled Burn Seminar for Young Writers and Savage Mountain Writers Workshop.

Rita Ciresi, Fiction Editor

Rita Ciresi is author of the novels Bring Back My Body to Me, Pink Slip, Blue Italian, and Remind Me Again Why I Married You. Her story collections include Sometimes I Dream in Italian and Mother Rocket (winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction). Her fiction, essays, and poetry have appeared in over fifty literary magazines and numerous anthologies devoted to Italian-American literature. She is professor of English and director of creative writing at the University of South Florida in Tampa. Visit her website at www.ritaciresi.com.